Latest Microsoft Windows update brings in added ransomware protection

Microsoft has released its latest Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16232 for PCs, bringing in new security features and advanced protection from malware infections.

Microsoft's latest Windows update brings in ransomware protection and WDAG support for Microsoft Edge.

Among other things, the latest Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16232 for PC includes improvements to the Windows Defender Application Guard (WDAG) which was first introduced in September of last year. WDAG now supports Microsoft Edge, thanks to which data such as your favorites, cookies, and saved passwords will be persisted across Application Guard sessions.

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You can activate this feature by enabling Data Persistence for Microsoft Edge in Application Guard using Group Policy. This can be done by first closing all Microsoft Edge windows, and then updating the Windows Components > Windows Defender Application Guard policy to turn on data persistence.

The latest build also allows you to 'audit, configure, and manage Windows system and application exploit mitigation settings' right from the Windows Defender Security Center without having to look for these options on Windows Defender Antivirus.

Microsoft has also introduced a new feature to let users protect valuable data from malicious apps and threats like ransomware. To take advantage of this feature, you need to visit the Windows Defender Security Centre, click on Virus & Threat protection settings and then activate the switch under 'Controlled folder access.'

"Controlled folder access monitors the changes that apps make to files in certain protected folders. If an app attempts to make a change to these files, and the app is blacklisted by the feature, you’ll get a notification about the attempt," said Dona Sarkar, a software engineer at Microsoft in a blog post.

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Aside from these security 'fixes', the latest build for Windows PCs also brings in fixes for existing issues like crashing apps, non-updation of battery status in unplugged laptops, Xbox Live in-game experiences not loading, and Task Manager hanging on launch.

Back in June, Microsoft released security patches for as many as 16 vulnerabilities in operating systems older than Windows 8 to help guard against 'potential attacks with characteristics similar to WannaCrypt.'

For those using older versions of Windows and having no access to regular security patches, Microsoft offers a custom support programme which, in some cases, costs up to $1,000 a year. The latest patches offered by the company are available for free and are not part of the programme.