Hackers steal upcoming Pirates Of The Caribbean movie, demand huge ransom

Suspected hackers have been able to get their hands around the upcoming Pirates Of The Caribbean movie and are asking for a large ransom in exchange of not releasing the movie.

Hackers are asking to be paid in Bitcoin as ransom but Disney is working with the FBI to find a way around the threat.

Disney is expected to release the fifth iteration of its popular Pirates Of The Caribbean series in the next few weeks. The company has been tight-lipped about the movie so far but did confirm recently that mischievous hackers had gotten hold of the movie and are asking to be paid in ransom.

Banks and cyber security: Of heists and ticking time bombs

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

It is unclear if Disney has been able to identify the hackers but it is learnt that the company is now cooperating with the FBI to trace them and possibly avoid paying ransom.

According to BGR, the upcoming movie could be Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales and Disney is expected to spring a surprise on fans with a fresh script. However, gold-digging hackers are aiming to spoil the fun by releasing the movie in bits and pieces before the actual release date. This may end up in Disney losing a handsome portion of its revenues, depending upon how much of the movie the hackers will release.

Ransomware attacks on the rise and universities under increased attack, finds Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report

Ransomware attacks are on the rise these days and the most prominent of them has been WannaCry. The said ransomware has affected over 300,000 systems in over 150 countries and affected users have been asked to pay ransom to get their systems back. Most of the affected systems ran outdated operating systems like Windows XP which haven't been updated in years.

Disney hasn't commented yet on whether the movie was taken by hacker behind the WannaCry ransomware. It is also unclear if the movie was grabbed from one of Disney's own computers or from the company's vendors. With the actual release date of the movie not too far, it won't take too long to find out.

Small and medium businesses most vulnerable to phishing and ransomware attacks

“This Disney hack is straight forward extortion and should be treated as the crime it really is. Well done Disney for refusing to pay and contacting law enforcement. It's an interesting example as it shows that ransom attacks don't just have to leverage crypto-locking," said Tony, Rowan, Chief security Consultant at SentinelOne.

"Cyber attacks that are stealthy can be used to steal intellectual property for whatever reason, and can in fact be far more damaging. These thefts and extortion attempts against content creators can be expected to grow in frequency and perhaps volume. It highlights the importance of using next generation endpoint security that is far more capable of dealing with unknown threats," he added.